Posted on

Audiobook–Our first

Nick Gilley reads No Evil is Wide

Nick Gilley reads No Evil is Wide

Audiobook Now Available:

No Evil is Wide by Randall Watson, read by Nick Gilley.
We count ourselves extremely fortunate to have Nick Gilley lending his rich deep voice to the project, and we are happy to announce that the No Evil is Wide audiobook is now available on Audible, iTunes, and Amazon. Mark our words, you’ll be seeing and hearing more from Nick Gilley. He is a unique talent.

About the book:

No Evil is Wide is a violent story of an unnamed narrator, the prostitute he is tasked to “find,” and Carpenter Wells, the man who makes it impossible for the narrator or the girl to return to the lives they knew. The remembrances of the narrator revolve around sexual awakening, family distance and dissolution—how they crumble to common and inevitable animalism. The story is filled with philosophical epistles to the reader while the world devolves into a chaotic madness of bombings and destruction not dissimilar to a potential contemporary existence that waits just over the horizon. It offers an uncanny reminder of the everyday violence we overlook.

Learn more on Audible

Posted on

No Evil is Wide by Randall Watson

No Evil is Wide by Randall Watson Cover

No Evil is Wide
A Novella by Randall Watson

978-1-948692-06-9 paper 16.95
978-1-948692-05-2 ebook 9.99
5½x8½, 144 pp.
Fiction
November 2018

ORDER Paperback HERE

ORDER Ebook HERE

About No Evil is Wide

No Evil is Wide is the linear and violent story of an unnamed narrator, the prostitute he is tasked to “find,” and Carpenter Wells, the man that makes that return impossible. The remembrances of the narrator revolve around sexual awakening, family distance and dissolution—how they crumble to common and inevitable animalism. It is filled with philosophical epistles to the reader that concretize the themes of the work. The narrative that allows the reader purchase within the text begins with the narrator locating the unnamed girl while the world devolves into a chaotic madness of bombings and destruction not dissimilar to contemporary existence. This chaos serves as an uncanny reminder of the everyday violence we overlook.

About the Author

Randall Watson’s first book, Las Delaciones del Sueño, was published in a bi-lingual edition by the Universidad Veracruzana in Xalapa, Mexico. His The Sleep Accusations received the Blue Lynx Poetry Award and his novella, Petals, (as Ellis Reece), won the Quarterly West Novella Contest. He is also the editor of TheWright of Addition, An Anthology of Texas Poetry published by Mutabilis Press. No Evil is Wide is a revised version of Petals, which received the 2006/07 Quarterly West prize in the novella, Judged by Brett Lott.

What People are Saying

just read [this] novella and loved it. gorgeous sentences. so lush even for all its darkness. something sort of noir-ish about it. i was so touched . . .

Nance Van Winckel, author of Our Foreigner, Book of No Ledge, and Pacific Walkers

I would not have picked the winner I have were anyone to try and tell me what it was about, what it was like, what it was. And in a way I am still struggling to figure out how to describe [it] except to say it is a work of art. Sometimes reminiscent of Cormac McCarthy, sometimes Kem Nunn, there is to this work the kind of ambition, the sort of bravery and insight and quality of writing and mind behind it that all defy easy summation. The language to this, its pace, its architecture, its audacity and cruel bone-jarring brutality and the cold and loving and miserable and strong-hearted vision of it just blew me a way. Period. This was a meaningful, powerful, flat-out, go-for-the-throat read on all fronts. And what makes it especially strong is that throughout this dark dark dark story there is a strand of hope, unbeatable, undeniable, unquenchable hope, despite the ugly and graphic and deadly world the story inhabits.

Brett Lott, former editor of Quarterly West, current editor of Crazy Horse

 

Posted on

Book Cover Design

No Evil is Wide by Randall Watson Cover

Don’t judge a book by its cover, they say

…but we all do it anyway.

Because of this, designing a book cover can be one of the most crucial and time consuming aspects of publishing a book (apart from actually writing the book, of course). The cover must be right.

When a book’s cover is wrong, can give a potential reader the wrong impression of what the book is about. This applies if the cover does not match the book’s genre; a shirtless man might draw Fifty Shades fans instead of the high-fantasy audience it was meant for. At the same time, a highbrow cover featuring abstract art might appear too “literary” for the casual reader, who will probably never read the synopsis on the cover to discover that the book is actually a YA adventure novel.

So how do I get the right cover image?

There are many ways to obtain cover art. On the more expensive end of the spectrum, an artist might be commissioned to create original artwork just for the book. It is also possible to license original artwork and photography that already exists, this is generally costly as well. If you are very lucky, you have artist friends who are willing to share their work at little or no charge. As was the case with No Evil is Wide by Randall Watson. In fact, Watson was spoiled for choice as he has an extensive personal art collection.

No Evil is Wide

Released in November of 2018, Watson’s novel is both dark and chaotic and we wanted to make sure that the cover reflected that. Watson wanted to use a piece from his personal art collection for the cover of No Evil is Wide, and there were some excellent paintings to choose from, but we ran into a snag. We didn’t have permission to use them.

Ownership of a piece of art, doesn’t mean one owns the right to reproduce that piece of art.

Ownership of a piece of art, doesn’t mean one owns the right to reproduce that piece of art. Physical ownership does not equal intellectual ownership. The author or publisher must have written permission from the artist to use their work, or a licensing agreement.

Luckily for us, Watson was able to track down one of his favorite artists despite the fact that they were out of touch for a decade. Once we received Charles Moody’s permission, we were able to create a selection of composite covers, each with a different painting of Moody’s. (see below)

Right off the bat, the third cover was simply too bright and did not match the overall theme of the novel, but we weren’t ready to give up on it, so we changed the background and typography colors, which improved it a lot, but the painting still didn’t convey a strong enough message. Similarly, the first image of the bird-headed girl, while powerful, didn’t have the violent appeal of the hand image. The bright reds in that painting screamed for our attention. We could see ourselves  picking up that bright red book at Barnes and Noble. Still, the author, Randall Watson, wasn’t sold on it, so we tried some variations.

There was still something about the red background and and the framed image that wasn’t right. The text and the image felt disconnected. Our resident millennial didn’t like how… “old” it felt—like a text book.

We had just read this Literary Hub article discussing the current fashion in covers that focuses on bold text using all-caps. We got mixed replies when we shared that article on Facebook, but I loved the bold type because it is easy to read, even on a tiny thumbnail of the cover. In addition, the font feels as though it’s a part of the image itself, not just slapped on top of a picture.

With that in mind, after playing around with fonts, colors, and layer blending modes in Photoshop, we came to our final rendition of the No Evil is Wide cover:

This cover immediately catches the eye–peaks the reader’s curiosity and makes them ask the important questions.

What’s up with that dude’s hand? It looks like he’s not having a very good time. Is that fire? Why is there an eye there? No Evil is Wide? What does that mean?

All fantastic questions that inevitably end with the most important thing you want a potential reader to think:

I’m gonna read the synopsis.