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Blue Moon Novel Competition Winners

A bright full moon in a jar

Join us in congratulating the winners for our Blue Moon Novel Competition!

First Prize:

Provenance is by Sue Mell. https://www.suemellwrites.com/

Second Prize:

Gravity Hill is by Susanne Davis.http://susannedavis.com/

Third Prize:

The Cyclone Release is by Bruce Overby. http://www.bruceoverby.com/


And don’t forget we still have two competitions open for submissions. Read about them at https://madvillepublishing.com/submit

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Valentine’s Day Special: The Autobiography of Francis N. Stein

This Valentine’s Day, we are offering The Autobiography of Francis N. Stein at a special price!

The Autobiography of Francis N. Stein: The Last Promethean

Francis N. Stein is the last descendant of Dr. Frankenstein’s wretch. I bet you didn’t know that the “monster” procreated, did you? This current generation Stein (the family shortened the name for obvious reasons) is a big hearted guy, and he really wants to do good, for all the right reasons. He’s just too trusting, and others take advantage of him, leaving him with trouble always nipping at his heels.

$12.95 for the regular edition

$15.95 for a signed copy

Set in contemporary Colorado, The Autobiography of Francis N. Stein: The Last Promethean is a hell of a story about the last imagined descendant of Dr. Frankenstein’s wretch—the spurned monster. It offers struggle and pathos, pain and absolution, deception and deliverance. Reminiscent of Neil Gaiman’s Shadow Moon from American Gods, Francis Stein is a slow thinking giant of a man who attracts attention wherever he goes. Stein seems cursed with bad luck, and trouble waits for him around every turn in spite of his good intentions.

A. Rooney, author of The Autobiography of Francis N. Stein

A. Rooney is an associate professor who teaches writing at Jindal Global University in Sonipat, India when not in Denver, Colorado. He has published a collection of stories, The Colorado Motet (Ghost Road Press) and a novella, Fall of the Rock Dove (Main Street Rag). His stories and poems have appeared in journals, magazines and websites all over the world. 


Mix Blue Velvet with a dash of True Romance, add some gothic and some noir, flavor with firebear and Pho—and enter the engaging, shifting, transforming, surreal vision of Francis, offspring of one of literature’s most famous creations . . .

Randall Watson, author of No Evil is Wide and The Geometry of Wishes


Rooney’s title character is a superb creation and, like Mary Shelley’s original, a compelling chronicler of life as a monstrous outsider, as terminally unique, “dependent on none and related to none” (to borrow Shelley’s phrase). Yet, driven by the police and other would-be destroyers high into the Colorado Rockies, Francis Stein manages to forge tenuous friendships: fragile connections with others that offer the possibility of redemption, of a second chance, of learning what it means to be genuinely human. Sharply written, with flashes of dark comedy and lyric evocations of the 21st-century American West, 
The Autobiography of Francis N. Stein gives us a beautiful monster for our time and place—as Shelley did for hers.

—Thomas H. Schmid, author of Fools of Time

The Autobiography of Francis N. Stein: The Last Promethean is a story of struggle and pathos, pain and absolution, deception and deliverance.  . . . [It] is an inherently fascinating novel about the last descendant of Dr. Frankenstein’s wretched creature, the spurned monster who ultimately turned upon his creator. [This is] An inherently riveting read from cover to cover, . . . a compelling novel that reflects the author’s genuine flair for originality and narrative driven storytelling. Doing full justice to the literary legacy of Mary Shelley’s FrankensteinThe Autobiography of Francis N. Stein: The Last Promethean is an especially and unreservedly recommended addition to community library collections and the personal reading lists of all dedicated Frankenstein fans.

—Micah Andrew, The Midwest Book Review

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FAIRVIEW CHRONICLES release date moved

Fairview Chronicle, written by Jonathan Paul, edited by Andrew Dunn

Fairview Chronicle, written by Jonathan Paul, edited by Andrew Dunn

Exciting News about Fairview Chronicles

Fairview Chronicles, the mystical horror fantasy novel by Johnathan Paul was slated to release through Madville Publishing in Spring 2019. This release date has now been moved back to Late Fall 2019. Worry not, the reason for the move is an exciting one. A television pilot based in the same world is being produced as we speak.

A TV Pilot!

Author Johnathan Paul and production company Datalus Pictures LLC are currently in pre-production on the hour-long pilot episode of Fairview Chronicles. The book will now release alongside the feature pilot, and work alongside the television pilot as one of three pieces in the initial media launch.

Thank you for your patience. More news to come!

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Audiobook–Our first

Nick Gilley reads No Evil is Wide

Nick Gilley reads No Evil is Wide

Audiobook Now Available:

No Evil is Wide by Randall Watson, read by Nick Gilley.
We count ourselves extremely fortunate to have Nick Gilley lending his rich deep voice to the project, and we are happy to announce that the No Evil is Wide audiobook is now available on Audible, iTunes, and Amazon. Mark our words, you’ll be seeing and hearing more from Nick Gilley. He is a unique talent.

About the book:

No Evil is Wide is a violent story of an unnamed narrator, the prostitute he is tasked to “find,” and Carpenter Wells, the man who makes it impossible for the narrator or the girl to return to the lives they knew. The remembrances of the narrator revolve around sexual awakening, family distance and dissolution—how they crumble to common and inevitable animalism. The story is filled with philosophical epistles to the reader while the world devolves into a chaotic madness of bombings and destruction not dissimilar to a potential contemporary existence that waits just over the horizon. It offers an uncanny reminder of the everyday violence we overlook.

Learn more on Audible

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No Evil is Wide by Randall Watson

No Evil is Wide by Randall Watson Cover

No Evil is Wide
A Novella by Randall Watson

978-1-948692-06-9 paper 16.95
978-1-948692-05-2 ebook 9.99
5½x8½, 144 pp.
Fiction
November 2018

ORDER Paperback HERE

ORDER Ebook HERE

About No Evil is Wide

No Evil is Wide is the linear and violent story of an unnamed narrator, the prostitute he is tasked to “find,” and Carpenter Wells, the man that makes that return impossible. The remembrances of the narrator revolve around sexual awakening, family distance and dissolution—how they crumble to common and inevitable animalism. It is filled with philosophical epistles to the reader that concretize the themes of the work. The narrative that allows the reader purchase within the text begins with the narrator locating the unnamed girl while the world devolves into a chaotic madness of bombings and destruction not dissimilar to contemporary existence. This chaos serves as an uncanny reminder of the everyday violence we overlook.

About the Author

Randall Watson’s first book, Las Delaciones del Sueño, was published in a bi-lingual edition by the Universidad Veracruzana in Xalapa, Mexico. His The Sleep Accusations received the Blue Lynx Poetry Award and his novella, Petals, (as Ellis Reece), won the Quarterly West Novella Contest. He is also the editor of TheWright of Addition, An Anthology of Texas Poetry published by Mutabilis Press. No Evil is Wide is a revised version of Petals, which received the 2006/07 Quarterly West prize in the novella, Judged by Brett Lott.

What People are Saying

just read [this] novella and loved it. gorgeous sentences. so lush even for all its darkness. something sort of noir-ish about it. i was so touched . . .

Nance Van Winckel, author of Our Foreigner, Book of No Ledge, and Pacific Walkers

I would not have picked the winner I have were anyone to try and tell me what it was about, what it was like, what it was. And in a way I am still struggling to figure out how to describe [it] except to say it is a work of art. Sometimes reminiscent of Cormac McCarthy, sometimes Kem Nunn, there is to this work the kind of ambition, the sort of bravery and insight and quality of writing and mind behind it that all defy easy summation. The language to this, its pace, its architecture, its audacity and cruel bone-jarring brutality and the cold and loving and miserable and strong-hearted vision of it just blew me a way. Period. This was a meaningful, powerful, flat-out, go-for-the-throat read on all fronts. And what makes it especially strong is that throughout this dark dark dark story there is a strand of hope, unbeatable, undeniable, unquenchable hope, despite the ugly and graphic and deadly world the story inhabits.

Brett Lott, former editor of Quarterly West, current editor of Crazy Horse