Editorial Services

Assessment
(Prices start at $250 per ms.)

  • A read-through of the work, also known as a “cold read.” An anonymous reader offers commentary about what’s working and what’s not. The author receives a written report that gives the following:
  • A synopsis: The reader’s understanding of what the work is about—probably the most useful part of the report, since it lets the author know whether the story they wanted to tell came across to the reader or not.
  • What is working—with examples.
  • What is not working—with examples and/or suggestions.
  • Recommendation: publish as is, publish with minor edits, publish with major edits, and do not publish.

Developmental/Substantive Editing, which addresses the following:
(Billed hourly at $65/hour)

  • Structural issues (reorganizing, cutting, expanding)
  • Plot flow
  • Sequencing
  • Pacing
  • Point of view
  • Dialogue, scene, and character development
  • Narrative and character arcs
  • Transitions
  • Any other big-picture questions an author has about whether his or her book “works” as is.

Copyediting/Line Editing, which addresses the following:
(Billed by the page at $4 per page—12 pt. Times New Roman, double-spaced with 1” margins)

  • Adherence to The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition, and Merriam-Webster’s Unabridged
  • Grammar
  • Punctuation
  • Syntax
  • Minor language repetition
  • Spelling

Proofreading, which addresses the following:
(Billed by the page at $2 per page—12 pt. Times New Roman, double-spaced with 1” margins)

  • Adherence to The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition, and Merriam-Webster’s Unabridged
  • Punctuation and grammatical errors remaining or introduced after copyedit is complete
  • Formatting errors/inconsistencies
  • Spelling

Here are some best editorial practices to consider:

  • Don’t shop a manuscript, or, God forbid, publish it until you have some unbiased editorial assistance. Two levels of editing is really the bare minimum.
  • Suck it up and spend some money. You’ll be glad you did.
  • You can request that an editor do a sample edit. This is a 5-10 page sample for a nominal fee that allows you to see how an editor works.
  • It’s always a good idea to “interview” a perspective editor by phone. Ask if they have worked on any other manuscripts in your genre? Ask for references.